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make writing more opaque (Kaweco 060 EF, dADBlack)?



agaric
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A newbie question. Is there a way to make ink write more opaquely (but not necessarily "wetter")?

 

I have a Kaweco Liliput in EF whose flow is good and whose stroke widths are perfect (after widening the tines a bit), but the resulting ink is not very opaque (more gray than black, not very saturated-looking).

 

Compared to a Jowo F nib, using the same ink, with an opacity that seems much better in my eyes, but the letters are just a bit too thick for the paper's grid.

 

Below is a photo comparing the Kaweco and the stock-Jowo nibs, but my lighting isn't good enough to properly demonstrate the situation. The ink is DeAtramentis Document Black and the paper is out of a 80g Leuchtturm1917 pocket notebook. Want the Liliput's EF to produce super-dark lines like the Axle's F does! I'd love to hear any of your suggestions, Thanks!

 

ef2.thumb.jpg.9bd5bdab4581a74e81deaabf6a0861ac.jpg

 

I also tried replacing the Liliput's feed with another one that I had previously deepened with a razor. The ink becomes much more "flowy" but once it dries, the opacity appears the same as with the less-flowy feed (ie. not very black). Will widening the tines further help? Is this even a realistic desire? (According to gadgetstop321 on youtube, it is possible, as I have the same nib as the one on her Kaweco AL Sport in EF):

 

 

Edited by agaric
same content, but better structure to be more clear with the question
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4 minutes ago, agaric said:

Is there a way to make ink write more opaquely (but not necessarily "wetter")?

 

A given ink has a particular (narrow range of) dye load, or concentration of colourants, as made. You put more colourant per unit surface area on the page, i.e. along the ink marks, by laying more ink down (i.e. writing "wetter") and allowing it to dry atop the paper and/or seep into the substrate. Or you make the ink more concentrated, effectively altering its formulation, before laying it on the paper surface with your pen; but, if you're prepared to do that, then you may as well just fill your pen with a different, more opaque ink in the first place. 

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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Thank you for the information.

 

So would you say that (as in the photo above) the Jowo F appears more opaque than the Kaweco EF because there's more surface area for the ink to contact the paper? I'm thinking now that a more restricted unit area (narrower tines) will forbid a certain density of colorant to transfer between the tines and onto the paper.

 

But what I don't get is how in gadgetstop321's writing sample (in the youtube video linked above, around 6:40 mark), the nib on her AL sport is both narrower and darker than some of her other nibs, which suggests that some other factor than surface area can make the writing more opaque.

 

 

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Ah sorry, I misread your text. More colorant per unit area, rather than more area. So if there's a way to get the EF to lay down more ink within the same stroke size... Perhaps a rounder tip will pull more ink onto that contact point (assuming the feed can keep up)?

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I would first try different inks, to get a more saturated ink in there. I find for example that pelikan black is very saturated and keeps line width under control. 

 

I wouldn't widen the tines as that will widen your line width, which you seem to like as is for now. Or if you did, I would do that ever so gently...

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Appreciate the suggestion. I'll look for and test out a Pelikan 4001 Brilliant Black.

 

addendum:

Is there something I can try if one assumes that using this specific ink as-is (dADBlack) is a requirement? I do have two Rohrer+Klingner inks on order, and I will test them too, but I really like the permanent characteristic of the dAD.

 

Clearly, the desired level of opacity is possible with this ink, as shown by the Jowo F, but the Kaweco EF is shy with it for some reason.

Edited by agaric
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3 hours ago, agaric said:

Is there a way to make ink write more opaquely (but not necessarily "wetter")?

2 hours ago, agaric said:

More colorant per unit area, rather than more area. So if there's a way to get the EF to lay down more ink within the same stroke size...

 

That is what hobbyists mean by “wetter”. Not necessarily a more lubricated or smoother kinaesthetic experience, but certainly more “writing fluid” flowing from pen to page and/or at a higher rate.

 

As for “stroke size”, whether the line width of ink marks made by a particular pen and nib would spread, as a consequence of more (volume of) ink being laid down per unit area, is dependent on the characteristic of the particular type or sheet of paper used. A sheet of Tomoe River FP 52gsm is going to be different from a sheet of Bloc Rhodia 80gsm, and again from a sheet of Milligram 80gsm maple paper in that regard.

 

2 hours ago, agaric said:

Clearly, the desired level of opacity is possible with this ink, as shown by the Jowo F, but the Kaweco EF is shy with it for some reason.

 

Then use the JoWo F nib, unless you really want to mess around with the Kaweco EF nib and alter its physical and/or performance characteristics.

 

I'm all for people knowing clearly and unambiguously the observable outcomes they want, especially if they've seen or experienced it before; but it isn't a reasonable goal to make every tool (or combination of pen-nib-ink-paper, in this context) deliver the same outcomes, or even if that's exactly what is desired, achieving it at the least cost and risk, and with the least effort and least irreversible changes that someone may later regret making.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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Buy better paper.

90g or better, outside 80g Rhoda.

A while back someone was complaining Pelikan 4001 black ink was gray. It turned out they were using an EF on poor paper.

 

I still got half a bottle of 4001 Brilliant Black bought 13 years ago, when I came back to fountain pens. So I must have had better 80g copy paper than the guy with the gray black ink, in my black ink was black. Quite nicely black too.

 

Pelikan 4001 Black was second to Aurora  black for decades. Now there are Noodler 'Black Hole' (not real name of them)  inks....lot of them that are much darker than either the Pelikan or Auroa blacks.

 

But do check your paper quality first.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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21 hours ago, A Smug Dill said:

what hobbyists mean by “wetter”

 

21 hours ago, A Smug Dill said:

dependent on the characteristic of the particular type or sheet of paper

 

21 hours ago, A Smug Dill said:

but it isn't a reasonable goal to make every tool (or combination of pen-nib-ink-paper, in this context) deliver the same outcomes

 

The explanations and opinions are much appreciated. They help clarify my question, but I think I do really seek optimal tool efficiency 🙂

 

I actually think getting some theoretical understanding of the mechanics is the least costly way to reach that optimality. But even with the information, I am still too green to start hacking away at nibs.

 

11 hours ago, Bo Bo Olson said:

Buy better paper

 

This is something I need to work on. I did try my experiments on a A6 Rhodiarama notebook but the results were the same as on the B6+ Leuchtturm: Jowo F gives fantastic opacity but the Kaweco EF produces much grayer/lighter lines. Both with the same dADBlack ink of course.

 

I also really want waterproofness in my ink (for notebooking/journaling) so I'd like to stick with dAD or R+K, but will definitely test the Pelikan for saturation. Noodlers are a bit tough to acquire where I am 😞

 

After a bit more thought, I've come to summarise my trials as follows:

  1. Kaweco EF nib + original feed (optimal stroke-width, adequate flow, suboptimal opacity)
  2. Kaweco EF nib + deepened feed (optimal stroke-width, more than adequate flow, suboptimal opacity)
  3. different pen with Jowo #6 F nib (optimal opacity and flow, suboptimal stroke-width) (hmm, maybe I should just look for a Jowo EF)

 

And together with the review by gadgetstop321, (and assuming factors like reservoir capacity and air pressure don't matter too much,) the (contextually relevant) factors that influence written opacity seem to lie somewhere among:

  • tip shape
  • tip material
  • positioning of tines (gap, alignment, angles, ...)
  • how downward force impacts all of the above
  • how nib size impacts all of the above

I understand specific information may not be readily available, but I'll keep looking around, performing nonaggressive experiments, and hoping for further helpful responses.

Edited by agaric
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1 hour ago, agaric said:

Jowo F gives fantastic opacity but the Kaweco EF produces much grayer/lighter lines. Both with the same dADBlack ink of course.

EF is always going to be lighter than F.... By being narrower it is a dryer nib. Try an M nib it being wider will be wetter than an EF or F....depending on ink and paper.

 

Pelikan makes a wet nib, because it makes a dry ink. Waterman makes a wet ink, because they made a narrow nib.

 

You don't say where you are at....so we don't know what paper is available to you.

But do look for 90g laser paper. Costs two mechanically delivered cans of Coke or two cups of Starbucks coffee more than common 80g copy paper. 

In Germany say @ E3.50-90 a ream of common copy paper, E 6.60-7.00 for 90g paper.

 

Besides which out side of 80g Rhoda, 90g laser paper allows two toned shading from shading inks. Something down the road for you it seems.

One can have nice fun with that sort of ink.

But you are into, right now,  getting your black ink blacker....better paper does the trick.

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, agaric said:

 

  • tip shape
  • tip material
  • positioning of tines (gap, alignment, angles, ...)WHY? Your pen works.
  • how downward force impacts all of the above (Yes, being 'noobie' Ham Fisted does make one stick with nails until your Hand is lighter.)
  • how nib size impacts all of the above....Yep, the wider a nib is the wetter it is. IMO Bigger don't mean much in it's the tip that is the size.

I understand specific information may not be readily available, but I'll keep looking around, performing nonaggressive experiments, and hoping for further helpful responses.

Don't experiment.....read....it's cheaper.

 You are going overboard for someone who just wants his black ink to be blacker.

Tip shape for a nice clean line, you for Western nibs have to go with nice used semi-vintage and vintage nibs.Tear drop shape is great; modern fat and blobby nibs not....but they are butter smooth....some are there for being over polished, have baby bottom. Sigh cubed.

 

Having chased mostly German pens, I don't know enough about Japanese nibs....outside they are designed for a tiny printed script.

If you Print go Japanese.

If you want a nice clean line and you write cursive go for a semi-vintage or vintage teardrop shaped tipping. You can also get nice springy comfortable riding  regular flex nibs.

As soon as you lose some of your Ham Fistedness.

I was Ham Fisted coming back to fountain pens after 40 years of pushing a ball point; like plowing the south 40 with out the mule.

 

Learn to hold a fountain pen like a fountain pen behind the big index knuckle at 45 degrees or at the start of the web of the thumb at 40 degrees.

Instead of before the big index knuckle like a ball point.

More of the nib tipping is on the paper, being therefore a bit wetter. Holding a fountain pen vertical like a ball point is part of why some have scratchy nib  problems.

The Classic Tripod grip, automatically presses and can do that hard.

 

I got away from the 10-2-6 of the tripod, into an automatically light grip that takes three minutes to learn and some days to practice. The Forefinger Up method.

I like it, my hand stopped hurting after I took it up. My hand didn't tire form pressing too hard with the Tripod.

Even though I knew I was supposed to hold the pen lightly I couldn't.............it is said one can after some 3 months or more of constant effort learn to grip a pen lightly in Tripod.

I took the 3 minute shortcut.

 

 

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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24 minutes ago, Bo Bo Olson said:

EF is always going to be lighter than F.... By being narrower it is a dryer nib.

 

That is factually incorrect. I have Sailor gold EF nibs that write darker and wetter than Sailor gold F nibs out-of-the-box using the same ink.

 

1 hour ago, agaric said:

I also really want waterproofness in my ink (for notebooking/journaling) so I'd like to stick with dAD or R+K

 

I have no idea whether those two ‘document’ inks are waterproof. The only black ink I know of that is as close to waterproof as I've ever seen is Platinum Carbon Black.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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8 hours ago, agaric said:

… but I think I do really seek optimal tool efficiency 🙂

 

I actually think getting some theoretical understanding of the mechanics is the least costly way to reach that optimality. …‹snip›…

I understand specific information may not be readily available, 

 

I have no idea what you mean by “tool efficiency” than can be evaluated, such that “optimality” can be determined across all possible scenarios, or at least a number of distinct scenarios, sorry.

 

If you want to consistently achieve the same functional and qualitative outcomes from an application of tools, the easiest (and thus most “efficient”) way is to use the same tools and materials, with the same techniques, and under the same conditions. No adjustments to be made to accommodate any differences and nuances, and no learning curve to overcome.


If you require ‘redundancy’, or allowance for ‘downtime’ to mitigate compounding effects of physical stress on some part, that a single unit of a tool wouldn't give you in the event that it is lost or damaged, or otherwise becomes unavailable, the easiest way is to acquire a second (or third, or nth) identical unit.

 

If you want two dissimilar tools to behave identically and consistently so, the easiest way (assuming it's possible) is to send them to a professional, with clear instructions on which one to tune or alter to match the characteristics of the other.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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Fantastic info. Thanks Bo Bo Olson and A Smug Dill.

 

15 hours ago, Bo Bo Olson said:

wants his black ink to be blacker

Yes, but "with a Kaweco 060 EF" is another condition. I could definitely try out other pens, inks, papers (and will certainly look into your suggestions), but I already bought the Liliput and the ink, love them, and want them to write blacker. Alas, it may be a naive wish.

 

I tried all sorts of grips and writing angles, and the stroke-widths would vary slightly but not the opacity. Pushing down very hard definitely transmits more ink and makes the line more opaque, but only towards the end of the stroke. Such gradation is not a bad thing, it's just that a consistently dark line seem more suited to journaling and record keeping.

 

15 hours ago, A Smug Dill said:

Sailor gold EF nibs that write darker and wetter than Sailor gold F

Precisely! And why is that the case? I frequently see suggestions (on youtube, blog posts, here) about manufacturing variability, quality control, feed ink flow, nib-feed alignment, etc. but not much information about the tipping mechanics. If we keep everything else the same, and see difference in opacity by only switching out the nib, then it seems to follow that the tip/tines (ie. the point of contact between pen and paper and the part immediately leading up to that point) is where the differential cause must be.

 

8 hours ago, A Smug Dill said:

“tool efficiency” ... "optimality"

Apologies for the insufficient characterisation. "Performance", rather than efficiency, is what I mean, and "optimal" only in relation to what I'd like to see. Basically, in this case, for "two dissimilar tools to behave identically and consistently so".

 

In any case, I don't mean to sound pushy or stubborn, just trying to respond precisely to points that were brought up. And again, I'm very grateful for the responses so far which have blossomed my scope of research.

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16 hours ago, Bo Bo Olson said:

More of the nib tipping is on the paper, being therefore a bit wetter

Aha, something I could try then is to get more of the tip to touch the paper.

 

16 hours ago, A Smug Dill said:

Platinum Carbon Black

I should get a hold of this before trying anything else.

Edited by agaric
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Every thing in fountain pens is horseshoe close.

That that isn't hand grenade close.

 

Nib width....each company has it's very own standards, that differ from other companies, and for good reasons.

 

In the old days it was One Man, One Pen; bought new every decade, when the pen became old fashioned or the nib worn because it was used 8 or more hours an day 5 days a week.

 

Back when the stock RADIO was selling for $1,000 a share, market surveys were done....where the new fangled Department stores and pen shops stressing nib width differences as expected.

Parker made a fatter nib than Sheaffer....and for a good reason, the customer was asked when he came into the pen shop or the pen counter at the department store, what pen do/did you have. If he said Parker out came the fat nibs, so he could pick one he was accustomed too. If he said Sheaffer out came the skinny nibs.

 

Never Ever did Parker want to make a skinny nib like Sheaffer; with nibs the same width. The Parker customer could make a horrible mistake and buy a Sheaffer.........and how would Parker win that customer back in ten years time when it was time to buy a new modern pen?

 

The part of it was how wet was the ink the Pen company produced. Parker being the wider nib had to make a dryer ink. Sheaffer had to make a wetter ink, in they made a drier ink...........Same goes for wet writing Pelikan with it's dry inks and Waterman's wet inks with it's narrow nibs.

 

 

If you use a wetter black ink...it will be darker in EF.

 

Agaric, I still don't know where you are from.. so help becomes more general than specific to your area...but it's my understanding Nooler's ink is an expensive imported ink by you.

The price seems to have fallen in Germany from E19 to E14. Do check out what it costs for Amazon to deliver to you  which ever of the many blacker than hell inks Noodler's makes. Though that carbon ink, could do your trick.

 

Japanese inks are wet....see what folks say about regular Japanese black inks....it need not be carbon. Perhaps that's the trick as suggested Carbon black. I stayed away from it in I remembered for two reasons, first I didn't use black, and it never lodged in my mind which were some problems with that ink. 

 

Tolerance follows in the next post.

 

 

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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Ron Zorn tolerance

Ron Zorn and Richard Binder went to the Sheaffer plant in Janesville as it closed down. They got to look at the gauges the nibs were inserted into to see how wide the tipping was.

 

Every company has it's very own  standard; usually for a good reason.

Parker makes or made a fatter nib than Sheaffer, so those who so wished or were so trained by their company of choice back in the day of One Man, One Pen.....(Chevy vs Ford)....to prevent a catastrophe....some Parker user, buying a Sheaffer for his pen of the decade. & vice versa. If Parker made a skinny nib like Sheaffer, why shouldn't a Parker fan not buy a Sheaffer pen...if they were the same width of nib. Such foolishness was avoided.

First you have to look at the Eras....Once Pelikan was narrower than both Parker and Sheaffer....

 

Then in '98 Pelikan went over to fat blobby nibs....wider than Parker or Sheaffer. That was done so ball point users could use a fountain pen with out going through all that hassle of learning how to hold a fountain pen. And stiffer nibs that ball point users had a harder time springing or turning nibs into pretzels.

MB is also fatter now than it was in semi-vintage and vintage days.

 

A Japanese poster said Sailor was the fattest Japanese nib, perhaps just a bit thinner  than pre 2010 Aurora (once the thinnest European nib. I haven't tested a newer Aurora nib, but that was the @ end of the Aurora semi-flex era.)

 

Japanese nibs are one or more widths narrower than modern Western nibs. They have to be in they are designed for a tiny printed script; not flowing cursive of western nibs.

 

There is a big gap between sizes of western and Japanese nibs. Those who start with Japanese pens always think of Western nibs as fat.

Those of us who started with Western nibs, know Japanese nibs as skinnier than marked size.

 

Japanese nibs could well be 1/2 a width narrower than 'narrow'  Pelikan vintage or semi-vintage nibs......................I don't know if they are even narrower than that.  I had enough $ problems chasing German pens.

 

Three companies, using their own standards plus tolerance means even with in the company it is only approximate and when compared to another company it's oranges vs tangerines, in each company has it's very own standard. Then drop in Japanese narrow nibs.

 

Someone's F could be another's EF or M or so close measurement don't really matter. Call the others a real Skinny F or a real Fat F.

 

.....and the new number standard of 1.2-1.0-0.8 are just as off as the letter BB, B or M nib sizes are.

 

Even robot cut steel nibs from Lamy are off in constant width. (I did see the older larger machine....Goulet's vid, shows the smaller new one.)

There will be variance.....it is completely normal for three pens of the same width coming off the factory's line to be each a bit different.....and still be with in tolerance...skinny F, fat F, & normal F.

 

Tolerance is normal, in the AI's haven't taken over and removed slop.

 

IMO many people are too OCD and expect every F nib to be exactly the same, even if made from a different company, much less of different eras.

 

Those boring times are coming in the AI days, until then, enjoy a thick, regular and thin F................and the next company's F that has a different standard so as your normal company....will over lap what you consider 'normal in F vs M.

Nib width is either horseshoe or hand grenade close; only.

 

Zorn's visit................................

Sheaffer used a dial indicator nib gauge for measuring nib sizes. The nib was inserted into the gauge, and the size read off of the dial. A given size being nibs that fell within a given range. What is listed below were the ranges given on a gauge that I saw in the Sheaffer service center prior to being closed in March 2008.

Measurements are in thousandths of an inch.....Fat and Skinny are exactly =.

XXF = 0.010 - 0.013
XF = 0.013 - 0.018
F = 0.018 - 0.025
M = 0.025 - 0.031
Broad* = 0.031 - 0.050
Stub = 0.038 - 0.050

*there was some overlap on the gauge. May be 0.035 - 0.050

German vintage '50-70 semi-flex stubs and those in oblique give the real thing in On Demand line variation. Modern Oblique is a waste of money for a shadow of line variation. Being too lazy to Hunt for affordable vintage oblique pens, lets you 'hunt' for line variation instead of having it.

RIP...200's once great nib, now a double ball.:crybaby::wallbash:

 

The cheapest lessons are from those who learned expensive lessons. Ignorance is best for learning expensive lessons.

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, agaric said:

If we keep everything else the same, and see difference in opacity by only switching out the nib, then it seems to follow that the tip/tines (ie. the point of contact between pen and paper and the part immediately leading up to that point) is where the differential cause must be.

 

Nope. If you simply slip (or jam) another nib, in place of the one you just pulled out, above the particular feed, then you may have changed to fit between the underside of the nib and the top part of the feed (where its ink channel is), which will have an impact on capillary action.

 

That's why, with a pen that is fitted with an ebonite feed, even when you're only replacing the nib with another of the same make and specification (e.g. FPR #5.5 two-tone Fine nib), it is still advised that you heat-set the feed to ensure its physical conformance with the new nib.

 

It's misguided to focus on the dimensions or geometry of the nib's tip, when its job is to deposit and spread the ink that comes through by capillary action (which determines flow rate). Even if the reaction to the downward pressure applied at the tip causes the tines to ‘flex’, spread, or bend and thus have an impact on subsequent capillary action, that's still because the fit of the other (than the tip) parts of the nib over the feed has changed.

I endeavour to be frank and truthful in what I write, show or otherwise present, when I relate my first-hand experiences that are not independently verifiable; and link to third-party content where I can, when I make a claim or refute a statement of fact in a thread. If there is something you can verify for yourself, I entreat you to do so, and judge for yourself what is right, correct for valid. I may be wrong, and my position or say-so is no more authoritative and carries no more weight than anyone else's here.

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21 hours ago, Bo Bo Olson said:

each company has it's very own standards

Very interesting. I guess it shows that companies want(ed) to correlate their brand with a consistent kind of writing experience, yet the level of consistency just can't be 100% due to manufacturing processes.

 

21 hours ago, Bo Bo Olson said:

still don't know where you are from

I'm located in Czechia, but I was looking for more general information. I think my original question has been answered by the next point:

 

16 hours ago, A Smug Dill said:

fit between the underside of the nib and the top part of the feed

...

nib's tip ... job is to deposit and spread the ink

I see! Makes complete sense. I will read up on the nib-feed relationship.

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I think this is overthinking. @ASmugDill already gave you the simplest advice: try another ink.

 

Noodler's inks have a reputation for both, saturation, wetness and permanence. You may find Noodler's Black or Heart of Darkness may provide the saturation you want. Other blacks also have a good reputation. The EFNIR ink reviews may guide you. There are plenty of blacks, and permanent blacks, out there.

 

Then, as already mentioned, is paper: poor paper will make ink spread more and look lighter. Get a better one.

 

Last you may want to look at the nib/feed, but for the cost, you may as well try an F nib and get done without any modifications. I put it last because that is the most delicate and difficult to get right.

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